Law enforcement officials say this is the illegal

Law enforcement officials say this is the illegal clinic in Smithtown where Brian Kaufman worked.

Prosecutors have charged a Smithtown man who is a felon with running an illegal health clinic, where they said he posed as a medical professional, selling steroids and even injecting patients with them.

Brian Michael Kaufman, 45, was charged Thursday with unauthorized practice of a profession, as well as three counts of fifth-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, three counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance, first-degree reckless endangerment, two counts of first-degree identity theft and two counts of second-degree identity theft.

Brian Kaufman, 45, of Smithtown.

Brian Kaufman, 45, of Smithtown.

He was arraigned before Suffolk County District Court Judge James Malone and released with restrictions that include GPS monitoring, drug testing and a travel ban restricting him to New York State. He is scheduled to next appear in court on March 24.

“This individual put lives in danger and posed a clear threat to public health by masquerading as a medical practitioner,” Suffolk County District Attorney Timothy Sini said in a prepared statement, adding: “He did not have patients; he had victims.”

The attorney of record for Kaufman, Jason Lawrence Russo of Bay Shore, could not immediately be reached for comment Friday.

Law enforcement officials said Kaufman, who has prior convictions in New York and Florida, ran a medical practice called Men’s Health of Smithtown, at 329 E. Middle Country Rd. They said an investigation by the district attorney’s office and the Drug Enforcement Administration’s Long Island Tactical Diversion Squad revealed that from as early as last August Kaufman ran the clinic, where he treated patients and even injected them with testosterone.

The clinic at 329 E. Middle Country Rd.,The clinic at 329 E. Middle Country Rd., Smithtown, where law enforcement officials say Kaufman worked.

Sini said Kaufman “also allegedly instructed employees of his clinic to perform injections or other medical procedures, such as drawing blood,” adding that after his arrest Kaufman admitted “he was not licensed to practice any medical profession” and had no training to provide medical services, which officials said included testosterone replacement therapy.

Officials said Kaufman has previous convictions in New York for first-degree reckless endangerment and third-degree grand larceny, and two prior convictions in Florida for trafficking cocaine and other illegal drugs.

The investigation into the clinic and activities there found that Kaufman ordered testosterone, which is a controlled substance, using the information of licensed physician assistants who worked there — without, authorities said, the permission or authority of those assistants.

A search warrant executed at the clinic on Wednesday also resulted in the recovery of unused syringes, blank prescription labels, and bottled prescriptions and controlled substances in manufacturers’ containers, officials said.

“This case is significant because it unearthed a felon playing doctor who jeopardized his ‘patients’ lives,” DEA Special Agent in Charge Ray Donovan said in a statement Friday. “In order to safeguard our communities, law enforcement has to act fast when they see someone threatening public health and safety. In this case, Brian Kaufman’s alleged testosterone trafficking ring put people in harm’s way while committing several crimes.”

Investigators are asking anyone who received treatment or services from Kaufman or the clinic to contact them at 631-853-8087.

If convicted on the top count, Kaufman faces a minimum of 2 to 4 years and maximum of 3½ to 7 years in prison.

Original article and credits can be found here.